Wachapreague AVP-56 - History

Wachapreague AVP-56 - History



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Wachapreague

An inlet on the eastern shore of the state of Virginia.
(AGP-8: dp. 2 592; 1. 310'9"; b. 41'1"; dr. 13'6"; s. 18.2 k.; cpi. 246; a. 2 5", 8 40mm., 8 20mm., 2 dct.; cl. Oyster Bay)

Wachapreague (AVP-56) was laid down on I February 1943 at Houghton, Wash., by the Lake Washington Shipyards; reclassified as a motor toruedo boat tender and redesignated AGP-8 on 2 February; launched on 10 July 1943; sponsored by Mrs. E. L. Barr; and commissioned on 17 May 1944, Lt. Comdr. Harold A. Stewart, USNR, in command.

Following her shakedown training out of San Diego, Calif., Wachapreague got underway on 18 July for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, en rqute to the South Pacific. Soon thereafter, she stopped briefly at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, and called at Brisbane, Australia, on 17 August, before reaching her ultimate destination, Milne Bay, New Guinea, three days later.

She dropped anchor at Motor Torpedo Boat Base 21 -at that time the largest PT boat operating base in the Pacific; reported to Commander, Motor Torpedo Boats, 7th Fleet; and commenced tending the 10 PT boats from Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron (MTBRon) 12. This unit had previously taken a heavy toll of Japanese barge traffic and had wreaked much havoc upon enemy shore installations, in almost nightly actions, during the New Guinea campaign. As Allied forces wrapped up the New Guinea operations, Wachapreague received an additional five boats from MTBRon 7 as the Navy prepared for operations to liberate the Philippine Islands.

On Friday, 13 October, Wachapreague sailed in company with Half Moon (AVP-26), two Army craft and two additional PT tenders, for Leyte-1,200 miles away. The 45 PT's were convoyed by the larger ships, refuelled while underway at sea, and successfully completed the voyage under their own power. Slowing to nine knots, Wachapreague fueled two boats simultaneously, one alongside to starboard and one asterneventually replenishing the fuel supply of all 1.5 of her brood. A brief two-day respite at Kossol Roads, Palau Islands, for repairs and a further refueling of the PT's, preceded the final le of the voyage.

While Wachapreague I]opped anchor at northern San Pedro Bay off Leyte, her PT's-fresh and ready for action immediately- entered Leyte Gulf on 21 October, the day after the initial landings on Leyte. Three days later, the tender shifted to Liloan Bay, a small anchorage which scarcely afforded the ship room to swing with the tide. Soon after her arrival at this body of water off Panoan Island, 65 air miles south of San Pedro Bay, Wachapreague contacted the Philippine guerrilla radio network for a mutual exchange of information as to Japanese forces lurking in the area.

On the afternoon of the 24th, upon receipt of word that three powerful Japanese task forces were approaching from three directions, Wachapreague's PT's sped to action stations. In the van of the southern enemy force steamed two battleships and a heavy cruiser, screened by four destroyers; 30 miles behind came the second group, consisting of three cruisers and four destroyers.

American PT's met the enemy's southern force headon; three coordinated destroyer torpedo attacks soon followed; while American battleships and cruisers under Rear Admiral Oldendorf deployed across the northern end of Surigao Strait to "cross the T." The devastation the American warships wreaked upon this enemy force was nearly total. Only one Japanese ship, Shigure, emerged from the fiery steel holocaust now known as the Battle of Surigao Strait.

PT's from MTBRon 12 then threw the second task group off balance at the head of the strait, slamming a torpedo into the side of light cruiser Abukuma and forcing the enemy ship out of the battle line, badly damaged. The Japahese flagship, heavy cruiser Nachi, collided with another ship in the melee and found her own speed reduced to 18 knots. This second echelon of Japanese ships, correctly surmising that the first had

fallen upon some hard times, then fled, hotly pursued by American planes which administered the coup de grace to sink the already-crippled Abukuma and destroyer Shiranui.

Meanwhile, to the north of the strait, Rear Admiral Sprague's escort carrier group held off a powerful Japanese battleship- cruiser force off Samar, while Admiral Halsey's 3d Fleet units crippled a Japanese battleship-carrier force off Cape Engafio. In these surface actions and in the ensuing air attacks, the Japanese lost a total of four carriers, a battleship, six cruisers and four destroyers, while suffering damage to three carriers five cruisers, and seven destroyers. The Battle for Le~te Gulf sounded the death knell of the Japanese Navy. As Admiral Chester W. Nimitz later wrote: "Our invasion of the Philippines was not even slowed down, and the losses sustained by the Japanese reduced their fleet from what had once been a powerful menace to the mere nuisance level."

Yet, while the Japanese capacity for seaborne operations lessened, they nevertheless could still strike back from the skies. While Wachapreague's ship's force labored mightily to repair the badly damaged PT-194, a Japanese plane attacked the ship, only to be driven off by a heavy antiaircraft barrage. Later on the 25th, the tender shifted to Hinimagan Bay for refuelling operations that would enable her six PT's to return to San Pedro Bay. Japanese nuisance attacks from the air continued, however, and a dive bomber attacked Wachapreague as the tender was just completing fueling operations with PT- 134. As the boat pulled away from the larger ship's side, a Japanese bomb landed some 18 feet from'its stern, killing one man and wounding four on board PT-134. Moving out under cover of a smokescreen, Wachapreague vacated her anchorage just before 14 Japanese planes struck and, while clearing the bay, fired on three twin-motored "Betties," claiming two kills as one "Betty" crashed into the sea a d a second, trailing a banner of smoke, crashed behind a nearby island.

Wachapreague arrived at San Pedro Bay late on the 26th and conducted tending operations at that site until 13 November. During this time, her PT's operated with devastating effect against Japanese shipping in the Ormoc Bay and Mindanao Sea areas. On the 13th, her task completed in these waters for the time being, Wachapreague sailed in company with Willoughby (AGP-9) for Mios Woendi. Returning two weeks later, Wachapreague now tended a total of 22 boats-from MTBRons 13, 16, and 28-as well as six more from MTBRon 36 and two from MTBRon 1:7, at San Pedro Bay. The tender remained at San Pedro until 4 January 1945, when she headed for Lingayen in company with MTBRons 28 and 36.

At noon on the day of departure, a Japanese suicide aircraft dived into a merchantman 100 yards ahead-a prelude to the dusk attack in which seven Japanese planes participated. In the latter action, one plane crashed in the sea some 100 yards ahead of the PT tender; another came under fire as it plunged toward SS Kyle B. Johnson; while a third headed for Wachapreague-only to be knocked into the sea by a heavy antiaircraft barrage. Later that evening, PT 382 came alongside the tender and transferred two men who had been blown overboard from Kyle B. Johnson during the earlier heavy air action.

Wachapreague entered Lingayen Gulf on the 13th and anchored near the town of Damortis. Three days later, she shifted her anchorage to Port Sual to tend boats from MTBRons 28 and 36. These boats gradually extended their patrols northward to the coastal towns of Vigan and Aparri, wreaking havoc on enemy barge traffic and shipping along the northwest coast of Luzon -shelling shore installations and destroying some 20 barges. Wachapreague meanwhile continued to make all electrical and engine repairs for the squadron PT's and handled all major communications until she departed Lingayen on 12 March to replenish at Leyte.
Underway again on 23 April, the tender accompanied MTBRon 36 to Dutch North Borneo and took part in the invasion of Tarakan Island. While the guns still pounded the shore and the invasion itself was underway, Wachapreague entered the bay on 1 May to establish an advance base for her boats. For the next four months, the motor torpedo boat tender operated from this bay, tending MTBRon 36 boats while they in turn conducted daily offensive runs up the coast of Borneo.

In the course of these operations, the PT's sought out and destroyed Japanese shipping at Tawao, Cowie Harbor, Noneokan, Dutch North Borneo, shelling and rocketing shore installations. As the Japanese later attempted evacuation by small boats and rafts, the PT's netted some 30 prisoners. In addition to these tasks, the PT's assisted LST retractions from the beachheads by speeding across the water astern of the landing ships and creating swells which enabled the LST's to back off and float free.

Wachapreague tended PT's after the end of the war, basing at Tarakan, until she headed home and arrived at San Francisco, Calif., on 5 December 1945. After upkeep at the Marc Island Naval Shipyard, Wachapreague got underway for the east coast on 20 March 1946 and reported at Boston on 6 April for inactivation. She was decommissioned on 10 May and transferred outright to the United States Coast Guard on the 27th. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 5 June 1946.

Renamed McCulloch-in honor of the financier, Hugh McCulloch (1808 to 1895), who served as Secretary of the Treasury for Presidents Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Johnson, and Chester A. Arthur-and designated WAVP-386, the ship initially operated out of Boston, and later into the 1970's out of Wilmington, N.C., as a weather patrol ship. Spending an average of 21 days per month at sea, McCulloch patrolled the direct line of air routes to Europe, relayed weather data to the United States Weather Bureau, and maintained an air-sea rescue station for overseas civilian and military flights. Subsequently redesignated WHEC-386, McCulloch remained engaged in these duties until more modern techniques of weather reporting and data gathering came into use and thus made the seagoing weather ships obsolete.

As one of the seven former Barnegat-class ships transferred by the Coast Guard to the South Vietna

mese Navy in 1971 and 1972, McCulloch was renamed Ngo Kuyen (HQ-17). The former coast guard cutter served that Southeast Asian republic as one of the largest and most heavily armed units of its navy, on patrol and coastal interdiction duties during the Vietnam War against the communists. In the spring of 1975, with the fall of the Saigon government, Ngo Kuyen, heavily laden with refugees, fled to the Philippines. As she and her sisters had become ships without a country, the ship was acquired by the Philippine government in 1975, and the transfer was made formal on 5 April 1976. She was subsequently renamed Gregorio de Pilar (PS-8) and served under that name into 1979.

Wachapreague received four battle stars for her World War II service.


Wachapreague AVP-56 - History

During the 1920s, several World War I "Bird" type minesweepers (AM) were assigned the mission of caring for the Navy's numerous seaplanes. They retained their AM series hull numbers for many years, but in January 1936 nine "Bird-Boats" were redesignated Small Seaplane Tenders and given new hull numbers ranging from AVP-1 through AVP-9.

The type proved useful, particularly in the light of a Pacific Ocean strategy that required widely-deployed seaplane detachments to search for enemy naval forces, and in 1938 construction of seven newly-designed small seaplane tenders was authorized. These became AVPs 10-13 and 21-23, completed in 1941-43, the first of the ultimately very large Barnegat class. At about the same time, in 1938 and 1939, seven World War I era "flush-deck & four-pipe" destroyers were reclassified as small seaplane tenders, numbered AVP 14-20, and converted to fit them for the mission. These ex-destroyers were all again reclassified in August 1940, becoming Seaplane Tenders (Destroyer), or AVD.

The Navy's great expansion of 1940-41 generated a program to built another forty-four Barnegat class AVPs, nine authorized in June 1940 (AVPs 23-32) and thirty-five in December 1941, just after the United States formally entered the fighting (AVPs 33-67). Sixteen of these were cancelled in late 1942 and in 1943, but the remaining twenty-eight were completed 1943-46, four of them as motor torpedo boat tenders (AGP 6-9).

The small seaplane tenders saw wide use as aviation support ships during and after the Second World War. Some of the handy-sized Barnegats were converted for other missions, among them surveying ships (AGS), oceanographic research ships (AGOR) and flagships for the Middle Eastern Force. Many were transferred to the U.S. Coast Guard, one to the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey and others joined foreign Navies, including those of Ethopia, Italy, Norway, the Republic of Vietnam, and the Philippines.

This page provides the hull numbers of all U.S. Navy small seaplane tenders numbered in the AVP series, with links to those with photos available in the Online Library.

See the list below to locate photographs of individual small seaplane tenders.

If the small seaplane tender you want does not have an active link on this page, contact the Photographic Section concerning other research options.

Left Column --
Small Seaplane Tenders numbered
AVP-1 through AVP-24:

  • AVP-1 : Lapwing (1918-1946),
    originally AM-1
  • AVP-2 : Heron (1918-1947),
    originally AM-10
  • AVP-3 : Thrush (1919-1946),
    originally AM-18
  • AVP-4 : Avocet (1918-1946),
    originally AM-19
  • AVP-5 : Teal (1918-1948),
    originally AM-23
  • AVP-6 : Pelican (1918-1946),
    originally AM-27
  • AVP-7 : Swan (1919-1946),
    originally AM-34
  • AVP-8 : Gannet (1919-1942),
    originally AM-41
  • AVP-9 : Sandpiper (1919-1946),
    originally AM-51

Right Column --
Small Seaplane Tenders numbered
AVP-25 through AVP-68:


Wachapreague AVP-56 - History

Wachapreague An inlet on the eastern shore of the state of Virginia.
(AGP-8: dp. 2,592 l. 310'9" b. 41'1" dr. 13'6" s. 18.2 k. epl. 246 a. 2 5", 8 40mm,, 8 20mm., 2 dct. cl. Oyster Bay )

Wachapreague (AVP-56) was laid down on 1 February 1943 at Houghton, Wash., by the Lake Washington Shipyards reclassified as a motor torpedo boat tender and redesignated AGP-8 on 2 February launched on 10 July 1943 sponsored by Mrs. E. L. Barr and commissioned on 17 May 1944, Lt. Comdr. Harold A. Stewart, USNR, in command.

Following her shakedown training out of San Diego, Calif., Wachapreague got underway on 18 July for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, en route to the South Pacific. Soon thereafter, she stopped briefly at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, and called at Brisbane, Australia, on 17 August, before reaching her ultimate destination, Milne Bay, New Guinea, three days later.

She dropped anchor at Motor Torpedo Boat Base 21 -at that time the largest PT boat operating base in the Pacific reported to Commander, Motor Torpedo Boats, 7th Fleet and commenced tending the 10 PT boats from Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron (MTBRon) 12. This unit had previously taken a heavy toll of Japanese barge traffic and had wreaked much havoc upon enemy shore installations, in almost nightly actions, during the New Guinea campaign. As Allied forces wrapped up the New Guinea operations, Wachapreague received an additional five boats from MTBRon 7 as the Navy prepared for operations to liberate the Philippine Islands.

On Friday, 13 October, Wachapreague sailed in company with Half Moon (AVP-26), two Army craft and two additional PT tenders, for Leyte-1,200 miles away. The 45 PT's were convoyed by the larger ships, refuelled while underway at sea, and successfully completed the voyage under their own power. Slowing to nine knots, Wachapreague fueled two boats simultaneously, one alongside to starboard and one astern, eventually replenishing the fuel supply of all 15 of her brood. A brief two-day respite at Kossol Roads, Palau Islands, for repairs and a further refueling of the PT's, preceded the final leg of the voyage.

While Wachapreague dropped anchor at northern San Pedro Bay off Leyte, her PT's-fresh and ready for action immediately-entered Leyte Gulf on 21 October, the day after the initial landings on Leyte. Three days later, the tender shifted to Liloan Bay, a small anchorage which scarcely afforded the ship room to swing with the tide. Soon after her arrival at this body of water off Panoan Island, 65 air miles south of San Pedro Bay, Wachapreague contacted the Philippine guerrilla radio network for a mutual exchange of information as to Japanese forces lurking in the area.

On the afternoon of the 24tb, upon receipt of word that three powerful Japanese task forces were approaching from three directions, Wachapreague 's PT's sped to action stations. In the van of the southern enemy force steamed two battleships and a heavy cruiser, screened by four destroyers-, 30 miles behind came the second group, consisting of three cruisers and four destroyers.

American PT's met the enemy's southern force head-on three coordinated destroyer torpedo attacks soon followed while American battleships and cruisers under Rear Admiral Oldendorf deployed across the northern end of Surigao Strait to "cross the T." The devastation the American warships wreaked upon this enemy force was nearly total. Only one Japanese ship, Shigure , emerged from the fiery steel holocaust now known as the Battle of Surigao Strait.

PT's from MTBRon 12 then threw the second task group off balance at the head of the strait, slamming a torpedo into the side of light cruiser Abukuma and forcing the enemy ship out of the battle line, badly damaged. The Japanese flagship, heavy cruiser Nachi , collided with another ship in the melee and found her own speed reduced to 18 knots. This second echelon of Japanese ships, correctly surmising that the first had fallen upon some hard times, then fled, hotly pursued by American planes which administered the coup de grace to sink the already-crippled Abukuma and destroyer Shiranui . Meanwhile, to the north of the strait, Rear Admiral Sprague's escort carrier group held off a powerful Japanese battleship-cruiser force off Samar, while Admiral Halsey's 3d Fleet units crippled a Japanese battleship-carrier force off Cape Engano. In th ese surface actions and in the ensuing air attacks, the Japanese lost a total of four carriers, a battleship, six cruisers and four destroyers, while suffering damage to three carriers, five cruisers, and seven destroyers. The Battle for Leyte Gulf sounded the death knell of the Japanese Navy. As Admiral Chester W. Nimitz later wrote: "Our invasion of the Philippines was not even slowed down, and the losses sustained by the Japanese reduced their fleet from what had once been a powerful menace to the mere nuisance level."

Yet, while the Japanese capacity for seaborne operations lessened, they nevertheless could still strike back from the skies. While Wachapreague 's ship's force labored mightily to repair the badly damaged PT-194, a Japanese plane attacked the ship, only to be driven off by a heavy antiaircraft barrage. Later on the 25th, the tender shifted to Hinunagan Bay for refuelling operations that would enable her six PT's to return to San Pedro Bay. Japanese nuisance attacks from the air continued, however, and a dive bomber attacked Wachapreague as the tender was just completing fuelling operations with PT-134. As the boat pulled away from the larger ship's side, a Japanese bomb landed some 15 feet from its stern, killing one man and wounding four on board PT-134. Moving out under cover of a smokescreen, Wachapreage vacated her anchorage just before 14 Japanese planes struck and, while clearing the bay, fired on three twin-motored "Betties," claiming two kills as one "Betty" crashed into the sea and a second, trailing a banner of smoke, crashed behind a nearby island.

Wachapreague arrived at San Pedro Bay late on the 26th and conducted tending operations at that site until 13 November. During this time, her PT's operated with devastating effect azainst Japanese shipping in the Ormoc Bay and Mindanao Sea areas. On the 13th, her task completed in these waters for the time being, Wachapreague sailed in company with Willoughby (AGP-9) for Mios Woendi. Returning two weeks later, Wachapreague now tended a total of 22 boats-from MTBRons 13, 16, and 28 -as well as six more from MTBRon 36 and two from MTBRon 17, at San Pedro Bay. The tender remained at San Pedro until 4 January 1945, when she headed for Lingayen in company with MTBRons 28 and 36.

At noon on the day of departure, a Japanese suicide aircraft dived into a merchantman 100 yards ahead-a prelude to the dusk attack in which seven Japanese planes participated. In the latter action, one plane crashed in the sea some 100 yards ahead of the PT tender another came under fire as it plunged toward SS Kyle B. Johnson while a third headed for Wachapreague -only to be knocked into the sea by a heavy antiaircraft barrage. Later that evening, PT-882 came alongside the tender and transferred two men who had been blown overboard from Kyle B. Johnson during the earlier heavy air action.

Wachapreague entered Lingayen Gulf on the 13th and anchored near the town of Damortis. Three days later, she shifted her anchorage to Port Sual to tend boats from MTBRons 28 and 36. These boats gradually extended their patrols northward to the co astal towns of Vigan and Aparri, wreaking havoc on enemy barge traffic and shipping along the northwest coast of Luzon -shelling shore installations and destroying some 20 barges. Wachapreague meanwhile continued to make all electrical and engine repairs for the squadron PT's and handled all major communications until she departed Lingayen on 12 March to replenish at Leyte.

Underway again on 23 April, the tender accompanied MTBRon 36 to Dutch North Borneo and took part in the invasion of Tarakan Island. While the guns still pounded the shore and the invasion itself was underway, Wachapreague entered the bay on 1 May to establish an advance base for her boats. For the next four months, the motor torpedo boat tender operated from this bay, tending MTBRon 36 boats while they in turn conducted daily offensive runs up the coast of Borneo.

In the course of these operations, the PT's sought out and destroyed Japanese shipping at Tawao, Cowie Harbor, Noneokan, Dutch North Borneo, shelling and rocketing shore installations. As the Japanese later attempted evacuation by small boats and rafts, the PT's netted some 30 prisoners. In addition to these tasks, the PT's assisted LST retractions from the beachheads by speeding across the water astern of the landing ships and creating swells which enabled the LST's to back off and float free.

Wachapreague tended PT's after the end of the war, basing at Tarakan, until she headed home and arrived at San Francisco, Calif., on 5 December 1945. After upkeep at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Wachapreague got underway for the east co ast on 20 March 1946 and reported at Boston on 6 April for inactivation. She was decommissioned on 10 May and transferred outright to the United States Coast Guard on the 27th. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 5 June 1946.

Renamed McCulloch -in honor of the financier, Hugh McCulloch (1808 to 1895), who served as Secretary of the Treasury for Presidents Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Johnson, and Chester A. Arthur-and designated WAVP-386, the ship initially operated out of Boston, a nd later into the 1970's out of Wilmington, N.C., as a weather patrol ship. Spending an average of 21 days per month at sea, McCulloch patrolled the direct line of air routes to Europe, relayed weather data to the United States Weather Bureau, and mainta ined an air-sea rescue station for overseas civilian and military flights. Subsequently redesignated WHEC-386, McCulloch remained engaged in these duties until more modern techniques of weather reporting and data gathering came into use and thus made t he seagoing weather ships obsolete.

As one of the seven former Barnegat -class ships transferred by the Coast Guard to the South Vietnamese Navy in 1971 and 1972, McCulloch was renamed Ngo Kuyen (HQ-17). The former coast guard cutter served that Southeast Asian republic as one of the largest and most heavily armed units of its navy, on patrol and coastal interdiction duties during the Vietnam War against the communists. In the spring of 1975, with the fall of the Saigon government, Ngo Kuyen , heavily laden with refugees, fled to the Philippines. As she and her sisters had become ships without a country, the ship was acquired by the Philippine government in 1975, and the transfer was made formal on 5 April 1976. She was subsequently renamed Gregorio de Pilar (PS-8) and served under that name into 1979.


McCULLOCH WHEC 386

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Barnegat Class Small Seaplane Tender
    Keel Laid February 1 1943 as Small Seaplane Tender AVP-56
    Redesignated Motor Torpedo Boat Tender (AGP) May 11 1943
    Launched July 10 1943

Struck from Naval Register June 5 1946

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each name of the ship (for example, Bushnell AG-32 / Sumner AGS-5 are different names for the same ship so there should be one set of pages for Bushnell and one set for Sumner). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each name and/or commissioning period. Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


We Need a Mother(ship)


USNS Lewis B. Puller (MLP-3/AFSB-1) An artist’s conception of the Afloat Forward Staging Base. USMC Photo

Navy Times recently published an article “In war with drug trafficers, Coast Guard stretched thin.” There was a particular quote by the Commandant that caught my eye,

“Some 400 metric tons of cocaine cross U.S. borders every year — a drug trade valued at tens of billions of dollars, Zukunft said. Once upon a time, Coast Guard cutters would post a watch and wait for drug boats to get close, but now, there’s enough technology to detect them as they approach.

“The only problem: There aren’t enough ships and airplanes to catch them all.

“’We have an awareness of 80 percent, but we can only target 20 percent,’ Zukunft said. ‘We’re giving 60 percent of what we know, literally, a free pass.’”

This repeats similar comments we have heard from SouthCom. We have good information on drug trafficers, and we could catch a lot more if we just had more vessels available to respond. Note we need more vessels, not more highly capable vessels. This is part of what prompted my call for “Cutter X,” but there is another way. Instead of long endurance ships, perhaps, given support, shorter range assets could do the job.

Meanwhile, over in San Diego, NASSCO is building something that might make a useful contribution to addressing the need for more vessels by facilitating the use of less capable assets, a mothership, or Afloat Forward Staging Bases (AFSB).

“The design of the AFSB variant adds a flight deck, berthing, fuel storage, equipment storage, and repair spaces. With a rotating crew of civilian mariners and military personnel the ship can operate forward almost continuously, providing a base of operations for everything from counter-piracy/smuggling, maritime security, and mine clearing to humanitarian aid and disaster relief.”

With the exception of mine clearing, those missions are all in the Coast Guard’s wheelhouse. These or similar vessels could serve as mother ships or tenders for WPBs or WPCs extending their endurance and reach, supporting them far from their homeports and providing a base for supporting helicopters and UAVs.

We may be able to send only one or two large cutter at a time to the Eastern Pacific, but perhaps we could send six or so WPBs or WPCs.

They could also be used in responding to Natural disasters like Katrina or Sandy. They could be effectively a mobile Coast Guard group with both air and surface assets. If ice strengthened they could assume that role in the Arctic.

As big as they are, these ships have very small crews, and are relatively inexpensive to build–more than the OPC, but less than the Bertholfs. Certainly we should try the concept using Navy vessels first. In fact the first is expected to replace the USS Ponce, where it will presumably have some interaction with the six 110s serving with the Fifth Fleet.


United States Coast Guard career

Republic of Vietnam Navy service 1972-1975

McCulloch was transferred to South Vietnam in June 1972, one of seven former Barnegat-class ships transferred by the Coast Guard to the South Vietnamese Navy in 1971 and 1972. In South Vietnamese service she was renamed RVNS Ngo Kuyen (HQ-17). She served as one of South Vietnam's largest and most heavily armed naval units, and served in patrol and coastal interdiction duties during the Vietnam War. In late April 1975, upon the defeat of South Vietnam, Ngo Kuyen, heavily laden with refugees, fled to the Philippines. As she and her sisters had become ships without a country, Ngo Kuyen was acquired by the Republic of the Philippines in 1975, and the transfer was made formal on 5 April 1976.

Philippine Navy service 1977-1985

The former Ngo Kuyen was commissioned in the Philippine Navy in February 1977 as patrol vessel BRP Gregorio del Pilar (PF-8) until decommissioned in 1985. She was discarded in April 1990 and probably scrapped. [ 1 ]


Barnegat class

The Barnegat-class was a light seaplane tender - class of the United States Navy, built from 1939 to 1946 and used in World War II . The lead ship of the class was the USS Barnegat (AVP-10) named after Barnegat Bay . A total of 41 ships were planned, of which 35 were built, 30 of them as seaplane tenders , 4 as motor torpedo boat tenders and one as a training catapult ship . The ships were named after American waters and islands and carried the IDs AVP-10 to -13 and AVP-21 to -57.

After the World War, several ships of the class were used for support duties in the Korean War. 18 other ships were taken over by the Coast Guard and used as weather observation stations under the name Casco class . In 1971/72, seven of these ships were handed over to the Navy of the Republic of Vietnam as part of the Vietnamization , classified there as frigates and used in the Vietnam War. After the collapse of South Vietnam in 1975 six of the ships finally reached the Philippines , the seventh was captured by the North Vietnamese .

Three of the ships remaining in the US were used for marine research and surveying purposes Furthermore, several ships were sold to allied nations after their retirement, so to the Ethiopian , Greek , Italian and Norwegian navies, three other ships were disarmed and used as passenger ships in Greece.

In the United States, the last ship of the class was decommissioned in 1973, while the second and third users, some of the ships were in service until well into the 1990s.


Coast Guard Station Wachapreague holds change of command ceremony

WACHAPREAGUE, Va. – Chief Petty Officer Charles Dawkins relieved Chief Warrant Officer Jason Norris as the Officer in Charge of Coast Guard Station Wachapreague during a change of command ceremony held at Station Wachapreague, Friday.

Capt. Samson Stevens, commander of Coast Guard Sector Virginia, presided over the ceremony.

Chief Dawkins is reporting to Station Wachapreague after serving as the executive petty officer aboard Coast Guard Cutter Bridle, homeported in Southwest Harbor, Maine.

Station Wachapreague is a multi-mission station which conducts search and rescue, recreational boating safety, maritime law enforcement, ports and waterways security, and marine environmental response operations on the Eastern Shore.

Change of command ceremonies are time-honored traditions deeply rooted in Coast Guard and Naval history signifying the total transfer of responsibility, authority, and command of a military unit.


Konstrukce [ editovat | editovat zdroj ]

Třída Barnegat [ editovat | editovat zdroj ]

Pohonný systém tvořily dva diesly, pohánějící dva lodní šrouby. Ώ]

Třída Casco [ editovat | editovat zdroj ]

Osmnáct plavidel bylo přestavěno na kutry a v letech 1948–1949 zařazeno do americké pobřežní stráže. Novou výzbroj tvořil jeden 127mm kanón, dva 40mm kanóny Bofors, jeden vrhač hlubinných pum Hedgehog a čtyři vrhače hlubinných pum. V㺼. letech plavidla dostala trojhlavňový 324mm protiponorkový torpédomet. Většina plavidel byla používána pro meteorologickou službu, a proto byly vybaveny hangárem a prošinou pro vypouštění meteorologických balónů. ⎲]


Wachapreague, VA

Wachapreague is a town in Accomack County, Virginia, United States. The population was 236 at the 2000 census.
Wachapreague, known as the Little City by the Sea, has a long and fruitful history. The name of the town came from the Wachapreague, an Algonquian people who resided in the area centuries ago. This area was natural high ground that had easiest access to the ocean on the whole Eastern Shore. Emperor Wachiwampe left Wachapreague to his daughter in a will in 1656.
In 1744, the Teackles settled in the area and built a home at what is today 15 Brooklyn Avenue. In 1779, a British sloop Thistle came near the town but was forced away from Wachapreague Channel and sunk by fire from forts on Parramore and Cedar Islands. There was a tidal gristmill in the area located on Mill Creek to the south of town. It was not until 1874 that Wachapreague began as a small town. In that year, the Powell brothers sold the first lots to Isaac Phillips and Francis Smith. By 1883, 15 lots had been sold. The next year, the town applied for a post office and was denied the name Powellton since this name was already taken. The town chose the name Wachapreague in its place.


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