Bronze Age Military Equipment, Dan Howard

Bronze Age Military Equipment, Dan Howard



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Bronze Age Military Equipment, Dan Howard

Bronze Age Military Equipment, Dan Howard

This book attempts to summarise the current stage of knowledge about the military equipment of the Bronze Age Near East, Middle East and eastern Mediterranean, looking at weapons, chariots, armour and shields. The main strength of this book is Howard's determination to stick to provable facts. He doesn't consider artistic representations of armour to be of great value, and gives a very convincing explanation of this attitude - so much of the interpretation of art works is effectively guesswork, with painted metal, leather and linen armours looking similar and details of armour deduced from patterns that were probably just an artistic convention.

He thus bases all of his conclusions on the rare surviving examples of armour, supported by contemporary textual descriptions. Many of these early texts were working documents and records, so contain plenty of linguistic clues. Contemporary artwork is used as a supplementary source, used to help interpret the surviving fragments of equipment. Modern reconstructions and the results of experimental archaeology are also used, although many had quite serious flaws which Howard has to work around.

There are just enough illustrations to support the more difficult parts of the text (at first I didn't realise that the illustrations to go with the long list of sword types were all placed at the back of the book). Most are scattered around the text, although there is a section of colour plates that make you realise just how beautiful ancient bronze was.

This is a fairly dry read, but it is also a very valuable piece of work, providing a splendid overview of the current state of knowledge on the military equipment of these early civilisations, possibly the first ones to engage in large scale warfare.

Chapters
1 - Bronze Age Warfare
2 - Weapons
3 - Chariots
4 - Armour
5 - Shields

Appendices
1 - Homeric Shields
2 - Homeric Armour
3 - Warriors of the Bronze Age
4 - Typology of Bronze Age Swords

Author: Dan Howard
Edition: Hardcover
Pages: 169
Publisher: Pen & Sword Military
Year: 2011



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Bronze Age Military Equipment by Dan Howard

Category: eBooks
Binding: Kindle Edition
Author: Dan Howard
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Gobua Conciliate

Read or Download Bronze Age Military Equipment Book by Dan Howard. It is one of the best seller books in this month. Avaliable format in PDF, EPUB, MOBI, KINDLE, E-BOOK and AUDIOBOOK.

Bronze Age Military Equipment by Dan Howard

Category: eBooks
Binding: Kindle Edition
Author: Dan Howard
Number of Pages:
Amazon.com Price : $9.59
Lowest Price : $9.59
Total Offers : 1
Rating: 4.0
Total Reviews: 8

Bronze Age Military Equipment is big ebook you must read. You can download any ebooks you wanted like Bronze Age Military Equipment in simple step and you can read full version it now. Nice ebook you must read is Bronze Age Military Equipment. I am sure you will like the Bronze Age Military Equipment. You can download it to your computer through easy steps.

Results for Bronze Age Military Equipment by Dan Howard

Read or Download Bronze Age Military Equipment Book by Dan Howard. This awesome book ready for download, you can get this book now for FREE. All your favorite books and authors in one place! PDF, ePubs, MOBI, eMagazines, ePaper, eJournal and more.

Bronze Age Military Equipment by Dan Howard accessibility Books LIbrary as well as its powerful features, including thousands and thousands of title from favorite author, along with the capability to read or download hundreds of boos on your pc or smartphone in minutes.


Contents

Howard enlisted in the Army in 1956 at Montgomery, Alabama and retired as colonel, Army Special Forces, in 1992.

Howard's service in Vietnam included assignments with 1/327th Airborne Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division, 5th Special Forces Group and MACV-SOG

As a staff sergeant of the highly classified Military Assistance Command, Vietnam – Studies and Observations Group (MACV-SOG), Howard was recommended for the Medal of Honor on three occasions for three individual actions during thirteen months spanning 1967–1968. The first two nominations were downgraded to a Silver Star and the Distinguished Service Cross due to the covert and top secret nature of the operations in which Howard participated.

As a sergeant first class of the SOG, he risked his life during a rescue mission in Cambodia on December 30, 1968, while second in command of a platoon-sized Hatchet Force that was searching for missing American soldier Robert Scherdin for which he was awarded the Medal of Honor. [2] : 205–6 [3] He learned of the award over a two-way radio while under enemy fire, immediately after being wounded, resulting in one of his eight Purple Hearts. [4]

Howard was wounded 14 times during a 54-month period in the Vietnam War. For his distinguished service, Howard received a direct appointment from Master Sergeant to First Lieutenant in December 1969.

Howard graduated from Ranger School class 7-73 in May 1973 and served with the 2nd Ranger Battalion at Fort Lewis, Washington as company commander. From 1977 to 1978 he served as Mountain Ranger Training instructor.

Howard later served as officer-in-charge of Special Forces training at Camp Mackall, near Ft. Bragg, N.C., and later, commanding the Mountain Ranger Training Camp at Dahlonega, Georgia

Howard graduated from the National War College, Class 1987–1988.

He received two master's degrees during his Army career which spanned 1956 to 1992. Howard retired as a colonel in 1992. [5]

He was one of the most decorated soldiers in the Vietnam War. [6] [7] NBC News said that Howard may have been the most highly decorated American soldier of the modern era, [8] while KWTX-TV states that he was "said to be the most decorated service member in the history of the United States". [9] John Plaster in his 1998 book SOG: The Secret Wars of America's Commandos in Vietnam states that Howard "remains to this day the most highly decorated American soldier." [2] : 204

His residence was in Texas and he spent much of his free time working with veterans until the time of his death. He also took periodic trips to Iraq to visit active duty troops. [8]

Howard died of pancreatic cancer at a hospital in Waco, Texas, on December 23, 2009. He was survived by four children and five grandchildren. [5] [10]

His funeral was in Arlington National Cemetery on February 22, 2010. [11]

In 2014, Howard was announced as the recipient of United States Special Operations Command's Bull Simons award for his "lifetime achievements in Special Operations". [12]

In April 2017 a building at the Rowe Training Facility on Camp Mackall was named Howard Hall in his honor. [13]

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. 1st Lt. Howard (then SFC .), distinguished himself while serving as platoon sergeant of an American-Vietnamese platoon which was on a mission to rescue a missing American soldier in enemy controlled territory in the Republic of Vietnam. The platoon had left its helicopter landing zone and was moving out on its mission when it was attacked by an estimated 2-company force. During the initial engagement, 1st Lt. Howard was wounded and his weapon destroyed by a grenade explosion. 1st Lt. Howard saw his platoon leader had been wounded seriously and was exposed to fire. Although unable to walk, and weaponless, 1st Lt. Howard unhesitatingly crawled through a hail of fire to retrieve his wounded leader. As 1st Lt. Howard was administering first aid and removing the officer's equipment, an enemy bullet struck 1 of the ammunition pouches on the lieutenant's belt, detonating several magazines of ammunition. 1st Lt. Howard momentarily sought cover and then realizing that he must rejoin the platoon, which had been disorganized by the enemy attack, he again began dragging the seriously wounded officer toward the platoon area. Through his outstanding example of indomitable courage and bravery, 1st Lt. Howard was able to rally the platoon into an organized defense force. With complete disregard for his safety, 1st Lt. Howard crawled from position to position, administering first aid to the wounded, giving encouragement to the defenders and directing their fire on the encircling enemy. For 3 1 ⁄ 2 hours 1st Lt. Howard's small force and supporting aircraft successfully repulsed enemy attacks and finally were in sufficient control to permit the landing of rescue helicopters. 1st Lt. Howard personally supervised the loading of his men and did not leave the bullet-swept landing zone until all were aboard safely. 1st Lt. Howard's gallantry in action, his complete devotion to the welfare of his men at the risk of his life were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army.

General Orders: Department of the Army, General Orders No. 16 (March 24, 1971)

Action Date: December 30, 1968

Service: Army

Regiment: 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne)

Division: 1st Special Forces

Robert L. Howard
Service: Army
Division: 1st Special Forces
GENERAL ORDERS:
General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2018 (May 2, 1968)

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Sergeant First Class Robert Lewis Howard (ASN: RA-14628152), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Command and Control (Central), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Howard distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 November 1967, as Special Forces Advisor to a joint American and Vietnamese reconnaissance patrol conducting a search mission near the Laotian border. His patrol discovered a huge rice and ammunition cache surrounded by an enemy bunker complex. Sergeant Howard led a small team to provide security while the remainder of the unit began to destroy the stored supplies. His team encountered four North Vietnamese Army soldiers, and Sergeant Howard killed them with a fierce burst of rifle fire. He and his men were immediately pinned down by a murderous curtain of fire which erupted from a nearby enemy machine gun position. With complete disregard for his safety, Sergeant Howard crawled toward the emplacement and killed a North Vietnamese sniper who was firing at him as he maneuvered. He then charged the bunker, eliminating its occupants with rifle fire. A second machine gun position unleashed a savage barrage. Sergeant Howard moved his troops to a covered location and directed an air strike against the fortified bunker. While assessing the bomb damage, Sergeant Howard was fired upon by North Vietnamese soldiers in the bunker who had survived the blasts. Pinned down directly outside the strongpoint with a blazing machine gun barrel only six inches above his head, he threw a hand grenade into the aperture of the emplacement, killing the gunners and temporarily silencing the weapon. He then dashed to his team's location and secured a light anti-tank weapon. As the enemy machine gun resumed firing, Sergeant Howard stood up amid a withering hail of bullets, fired his weapon, and completely demolished the position. His fearless and determined actions in close combat enabled the remainder of the patrol to destroy the enemy cache. Sergeant First Class Howard's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.


King Tut: Mummy and Tomb

After he died, King Tut was mummified according to Egyptian religious tradition, which held that royal bodies should be preserved and provisioned for the afterlife. Embalmers removed his organs and wrapped him in resin-soaked bandages, a 24-pound solid gold portrait mask was placed over his head and shoulders and he was laid in a series of nested containers—three golden coffins, a granite sarcophagus and four gilded wooden shrines, the largest of which barely fit into the tomb’s burial chamber.

Because of his tomb’s small size, historians suggest King Tut’s death must have been unexpected and his burial rushed by Ay, who succeeded him as pharaoh. The tomb’s antechambers were packed to the ceiling with more than 5,000 artifacts, including furniture, chariots, clothes, weapons and 130 of the lame king’s walking sticks. The entrance corridor was apparently looted soon after the burial, but the inner rooms remained sealed. The pharaohs who followed Tut chose to ignore his reign, as despite his work restoring Amun, he was tainted by the connection to his father’s religious upheavals. Within a few generations, the tomb’s entrance had been clogged with stone debris, built over by workmen’s huts and forgotten.

By the time he discovered Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922, British archaeologist Howard Carter had been excavating Egyptian antiquities for three decades. At the time of the discovery, archaeologists believed that all the royal tombs in the Valley of the Kings, across the river from ancient Thebes, had already been cleared. Excitement about the new tomb—the most intact ever found—quickly spread worldwide. It took Carter and his team a decade to catalogue and empty the tomb.


7. Robin Olds

Gravitas. A nuanced word that can be difficult to describe but easily understood when looking a photo of triple ace (5 kills = ace) fighter pilot, Robin Olds . He not only looked the part of a superhero — but actually lived it with his lead-from-the front swagger and natural born talent. Not surprisingly, he even married a movie star and pin-up icon, Ella Raines, to complete the picture. However, for all of his many outstanding attributes, it was his non-regulation handlebar mustache dubbed “bulletproof” that would achieve rock star status. The whiskers also pissed off his superiors — which was exactly the point for the rebellious fighter jock who had it all.

Raised in a military family, Olds’ father had been an aviation pioneer in WWI and eventually rose to the rank of a Major General in the Army Air Corp (precursor to the U.S. Air force). The younger Olds attended West Point where he became a football All-American before earning his wings as a pilot in WWII. Shortly after arriving in France in 1944, he earned the first of his 12 confirmed kills during the war, flying P-38s and Mustang P-51s.

He later participated in transcontinental jet races and flew with the air force’s first aerobatic demonstration team, further honing his flying skills and leadership qualities. But his outspoken demeanor and demands for improved training and equipment saw him branded as a troublemaker and iconoclast by higher-ranking officers, who kept him grounded during the Korean War. Olds nearly walked away from the military altogether, but eventually took command of the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing in Vietnam.

His finest hour came in 1967 when he devised a plan labeled “Operation Bolo,” in which F-4 Phantoms used radar-jamming devices to lure (Soviet-made) MiG-21s into a trap. When North Vietnamese fighters responded by attacking what appeared to be slower-moving aircraft, the faster F-4s downed seven enemy jets, including two by Olds in the what became the biggest air battle of the war. He would later bag two more MiGs, giving him a total of 16 kills in his career. Always the outlaw, he stopped logging his combat missions at 99 to avoid reaching the limit that would rotate him back home. He also didn’t want to be used as a publicity tool, and avoided adding more kills to his already impressive record.

By the time he finally retired from the military, now Brigadier General Olds had been decorated 54 times, including the Air Force Cross (USAF’s highest honor), two Air Force Distinguished Service Medals, four Silver Stars, six Distinguished Flying Crosses, Legion of Merit and Croix de Guerre.

As for that infamous ’stache, Olds cemented his legend this way: “It became the middle finger I couldn’t raise in the [public relations] photographs,” he said. “The mustache became my silent last word in the verbal battles … with higher headquarters on rules, targets and fighting the war.”


How Can I Find a List of Bronze Star Medal Recipients?

The most comprehensive list of recipients of the Bronze Star Medal is available in the form of software provided by the American War Library. After downloading and installing the software, which provides access to the library's database, click on the Medal Lists/Rosters button to access and search the list.

The American War Library's list is constantly being updated with information on confirmed recipients of the Bronze Star from all five armed forces: Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard.

The Bronze Star has been awarded since 1944 and can be given for acts of merit, heroism or meritorious service in combat that doesn't involve flight. The medal has to be earned in an active combat zone, although there is some debate about the medal being given out quite liberally for meritorious service. One such example is the five medals that were given to Air Force officers for their roles in the Kosovo conflict, despite the fact that they remained at their base in Missouri throughout it.


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Timeline


Oklahoma City Bombing

In September 1994, McVeigh put into motion his plan to destroy the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. With accomplices Nichols and Fortier, McVeigh acquired tons of ammonium nitrate fertilizer and gallons of fuel to form a highly volatile explosive. McVeigh chose the Murrah Federal Building because it provided excellent camera angles for media coverage. He wanted to make this attack a platform for his anti-government message.

On the morning of April 19, 1995, the second anniversary of the FBI siege on the Branch Davidian compound, McVeigh parked a Ryder truck loaded with the explosive substance in front of the Murray building. People were coming to work and on the second floor, children were arriving at the day-care center. At 9:02 a.m., the explosion ripped the entire north wall off the building, destroying all nine floors. More than 300 other buildings in the immediate area were damaged or destroyed. In the rubble were 168 victims, including 19 young children, and another 650-plus wounded.


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